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2019i Table of Contents

Create parametric profiles using .clb files

Last updated September 10, 2019 by Tekla User Assistance tekla.documentation@trimble.com

Software version: 
2019i

Create parametric profiles using .clb files

Create parametric profiles using .clb files

You can create new parametric profiles using .clb files.

Follow the example workflow below to create a parametric profilepredefined profile whose cross section dimensions the user can change by using parametric variables

with .clb files.

How the .clb, components.clb and profitab.inp files work together

When you create new parametric profiles using this method, you need the following three files:

  • .clb

    This file contains the cross sectiongeometrical form of a part sectioned perpendicular to its axis

    definitions. Create a new .clb file in the ..\ProgramData\Trimble\Tekla Structures\<version>\environments\common\inp folder for each parametric profile you define.

  • components.clb

    This file contains a list of all .clb files that contain cross section definitions. When you create a new .clb file, you need to add its file name to the components.clb file located in the ..\ProgramData\Trimble\Tekla Structures\<version>\environments\common\inp folder.

  • profitab.inp

    This file is the link between the .clb files and the profile catalogcatalog that displays profiles and information on the profiles

    In addition to the available profiles in the respective Tekla Structures environment, the user can add fixed or parametric user-defined profiles to the profile catalog. It is also possible to import profiles to the profile catalog.

    . This file contains a list of all parametric profiles available in Tekla Structures. The file controls how the parametric profiles are displayed in the Modify Profile Catalog dialog box. When you want to take a new parametric profile into use, you must add the needed profile definitions, such as the profile type, prefix and the unit of measurement, to the profitab.inp file. The profitab.inp file is located under the environment folder in ..\ProgramData\Trimble\Tekla Structures\<version>\environments\<environment>\. The exact file location may vary depending on the folder structure of your environment files .

    Tekla Structures searches for the profitab.inp file in the standard search order and then from the folder indicated by the advanced option XS_PROFDB.

Define the shape and point coordinates of the profile

Start by defining the shape and point coordinates of the new profile.

  1. Design the profile on a paper.
    1. Draw the cross section outline.
    2. Add the needed corner points.
    3. Add the needed dimensions.
    4. Place the y-z coordinate axis center point to the middle of the cross section.

  2. Define the y and z coordinate directions. For example:
    • positive y axis: up
    • negative y axis: down
    • positive z axis: on the right
    • negative z axis: on the left

  3. Define the y and z vectors. For example:
    • y1, y2, y3
    • z1, z2, z3

  4. Make coordinate pairs to the points.

    Assign y, z vector pairs to each point. Start from the lower right corner and define the points in the counter clockwise order. For example:

    • point 1: y1 z3
    • point 2: y2 z3
    • point 3: y3 z2
    • point 4: y3 z1
    • point 5: y1 z1

Create the .clb file

After defining the shape and point coordinates of the profile, you can continue by creating the actual .clb file.

  1. Create a new .clb file using any standard text editor, for example Microsoft Notepad.
  2. Define a library name that will be used in the profitab.inp file for this profile.

    For example:

    library_id "1Gen"
  3. Define a cross section name that will be used in the profitab.inp file for this profile.

    For example:

  4. Define the dimensions of the cross section.

    For example:

  5. Define the coordinates of the profile.

    The coordinates must be the same as the y and z vectors that you defined earlier. Define the default values. For example:

  6. Define the geometry of one or several faces of the profile.

    For example:

    Note:

    The index number refers to the point number: 0=start point of the beam, 1=end point of the beam.

  7. Save the .clb file in the ..\ProgramData\Trimble\Tekla Structures\<version>\environments\common\inp folder.
  8. Open the components.clb file.
  9. Add your profile definition to the components.clb file by adding the following line:
    Include ”new_file_name.clb” // give comment
  10. Save the components.clb file.

Add profile definitions to the profitab.inp file

Before taking the new parametric profile into use, you must add the needed profile definitions to the profitab.inp file.

  1. Find the profitab.inp file, located under the environment folder in ..\ProgramData\Trimble\Tekla Structures\<version>\environments\<environment>\.
  2. Copy the profitab.inp file to a model, project or firm folderfolder that is used for storing Tekla Structures-related files customized for a particular organization

    A Tekla Structures user can, for example, customize a company’s cloning templates and save them in a sub-folder located under the firm folder. After this, the customized cloning templates can be used in all projects carried out for the company.

    .
  3. Open the file in the new location using a standard text editor, such as Microsoft Notepad.
  4. Under a suitable category, add a new line for the profile definition.

    Use the following syntax:

    Prefix ! Type ! SO ! Z ! MI ! MA ! G3-NAME ! Z3-NAME !
  5. Save the file.

    The profile is now available in the profile cataloguser interface for displaying or modifying information in categorized lists

    For example, profile catalog and shape catalog are catalogs.

    . You may have to restart Tekla Structures for the change to take effect.

Example

An example of a profile definition:

PNL_A ! USER ! 0 ! ! 2 ! 3 !1Gen.RectChamfer !h*b-[c]

Properties used in profitab.inp

Use the following properties when you define new parametric profiles using the profitab.inp file:

Property

Description

Prefix

Prefix of the parametric profile. The prefix is shown in the profile catalog.

For example, PNL_A.

Type

Type of the parametric profile.

The profile types are/include the following:

I, L, Z, U, PL, D, PD, P, C, T, HK, HQ, ZZ, CC, CW, CU, EB, BF, SPD, EC, ED, EE, EF, EZ, EW, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, USER

For example, in the default environment, parametric profiles with prefixes PD, EPD, CHS, CFCHS, O, Ø, and TUBE all group under the type PD, and appear under Circular hollow sections in the profile catalog.

SO

Sorting order. The options are:

  • -1 : Decreasing sorting order
  • +1 : Increasing sorting order
  • 0 : No sorting order
  • -2 : Name increasing, value decreasing
  • +2 : Value increasing, name decreasing

For example, if your profile is PLT200*10 or PLT10*200 and the sorting order is +2 , the result in the output (such as a report) for both cases is PLT200*10. If the sorting order is -2 , the result for both cases is PLT10*200.

Z

Unit of measurement. The options are:

  • 0 : millimeters
  • 1 : inches
  • 2 : feet
  • 3 : centimeters
  • 4 : meters

MI

Minimum number of parameters you can use with the parametric profile.

For example, the rectangular hollow section SHS has the following Profile subtypes : h*t , h*b*t , h1*b1-h2*b2*t. If you define SHS with a minimum of two and a maximum of two parameters, you will only have the option h*t available in the Select Profile dialog box.

MA

Maximum number of parameters you can use with the parametric profile.

G3-NAME

Refers to a cross section file ( .clb file).

Can be a combination of a library id and the name of a cross section, separated by a full stop. For example, 1Gen.RectChamfer.

Z3-NAME

Defines how the profile parameters relate to the parameters in the cross section file.

Parameters in the order of appearance in the .clb file, optional parameters in square brackets. For example, h*b-[c].

Can also be the name of the detailing component.

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